‘Parsley’s benefits beyond garnish’

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This site may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Garden Fresh Parsley Seeds

Parsley (petroselinum crispum / hortense) – Biennial

Symbolizes – Festivity, joy, victory and releases bitter emotions

The Greek did not eat parsley or grow in their homes as it represented death, however the Romans wore it to ward off intoxication!

There are two types of parsley grown for its leaves available in the Pacific Northwest.  One is a flat leaf called Italian Parsley and the second is curly leaf parsley.  In the Roman age it was considered  medicinal long before it became a common day-to-day edible sold in the veggie department of the corner store. A more recent form is root parsley.

Nutrients & Qualities in Parsley: 

Parsley contains Vitamins A, K, C, E, B6, B12, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic and pantothenic acid, choline, folates, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, potassium, zinc, copper, beta carotene,  energy, carbohydrates, fats, and protein.

Parsley is a source of the volatile compounds apiol, myristicin, limonene, eugenol, and alpha-thujene.


Medicinal Uses

Parsley has an amazingly number of medicinal uses:

  • Adrenals
  • Allergies
  • Appetite
  • Asthma
  • Bone
  • Breath
  • Cancer
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Detox
  • Digestion
  • Diuretic
  • Ear Infections
  • Fatigue
  • Gallstones
  • Gout
  • Heart
  • Immunity
  • Inflammation
  • Insect bites
  • Kidney Stones
  • Laxative
  • Liver
  • Oral
  • Skin Conditions
  • Urinary Tract

Master Herbalist Nicholas Culpeper  on Parsley:

It is under the dominion of Mercury; is very comfortable to the stomach; helps to provoke urine and women’s courses, to break wind both in the stomach and bowels, and doth a little open the body, but the root much more. It opens obstructions both of liver and spleen, and is therefore accounted one of the five opening roots. Galen commended it against the falling sickness, and to provoke urine mightily; especially if the roots be boiled, and eaten like Parsnips. The seed is effectual to provoke urine and women’s courses, to expel wind, to break the stone, and ease the pains and torments thereof; it is also effectual against the venom of any poisonous creature, and the danger that comes to them that have the lethargy, and is as good against the cough. The distilled water of Parsley is a familiar medicine with nurses to give their children when they are troubled with wind in the stomach or belly which they call the frets; and is also much available to them that are of great years. The leaves of Parsley laid to the eyes that are inflamed with heat, or swollen, doth much help them, if it be used with bread or meal; and being fried with butter, and applied to women’s breasts that are hard through the curdling of their milk, it abates the hardness quickly; and also takes away black and blue marks coming of bruises or falls. The juice thereof dropped into the ears with a little wine, eases the pains.

Culpeper was an English Botanist,  Master Herbalist, Physician, and Astrologer.


How to use Parsley:

Buy Canadian Seeds @ Richters Herbs in Toronto –  Curly Leaf Parsley or Italian Parsley


Recommended Reading:

Review:  Daisy S – For years, when I was served parsley as a garnish on a plate of food in a cafe, I just left it there. Later on, I learned that Parsley is a great vegetable to eat and full of vitamins and minerals And when I discovered this helpful book, I wanted to learn even more about Parsley. The book has been TRANSFORMING in that I have learned so much about parsley, why I want to eat more parsley and why parsley is so healing to the body


Resources:

  1. Compounds in parsley and dill help fight cancer, research shows“. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. 2016 June.
  2. Carnosol: a promising anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent“. University of Illinois at Chicago, USA. 2011 June.
  3. Luteolin, a flavonoid with potentials for cancer prevention and therapy“. National University of Singapore, Singapore. 2009 November.
  4. Parsley can fight cancer“. Hartland.
  5. Effect of parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) juice against cadmium neurotoxicity“. King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. 2016 February.
  6. Natural products as alternative treatments for metabolic bone disorders and for maintenance of bone health“. University of Reading, UK. 2007 February.
  7. Protective Effect of Parsley Juice“. King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. 2016 February.
  8. Facts about Vitamin C1“. University of Florida.
  9. Antimicrobial effects of pepper, parsley…”. Assuit University, Egypt. 2010 April.
  10. Chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity…”. Miguel Hernandez University, Spain. 2016 March.
  11. The antibacterial activity of aqueous extraction of…” An-najah National University, Palestine.
  12. Antiosteoporotic effect of Petroselinum crispum…”. Beni-Suef University, Egypt.
  13. Hepatoprotective effects of parsley…”. Beni-Suef University, Egypt. 2016 February.
  14. Effects of parsley…”. Istanbul University, Turkey. 2004 December.
  15. Vitamin A”. University of Rochester Medical Center.

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

 

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Fall Gardening by the Moon!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This site may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

  • Sept 12 to Sept 19
    • Good time to harvest!


  • Sept 20 to Oct 5
    •  Good time to plant winter veggies


  • Oct 6  to Oct 19
    • Great time to clean up!


 

  • Oct 20 to Nov 3
    • Great time for transplanting!


  • Nov 4 to Nov 18
    • Great time to finish gathering seeds for spring


  • Nov 19 to Dec 3
    • Great time to plan next years garden


  • Dec 4 to Dec 17
    • Great time to complete clearing clutter from garden


  • Dec 18 to Dec 21
    • Nature’s seeds have dropped. Finish ’18 garden intention to let it rest over winter!


Recommended Reading:

  • Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992
  • Book Review:  Wonderful Book, everyone should have a copy
    • on June 24, 1997 – I have every single one of this authors books. The information in them is terrific, including this one. It covers the different types of herbal philosophies. Mainly the Chinese and Ayurvedic systems. He integrates them both with western herbs, and makes it work. I won’t say his book has everything and every herb but it has a lot, and some of the more unusual herbs you usually can’t find in the regular every day herb books. It’s wonderful, and worth every penny you pay for it

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Medicinal & Beauty Cabinet Inventory of a Backyard Forager

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

by Renee Lindstrom

Medicinal & Beauty Cabinet of Backyard Forager

Here are some pictures of a living medicinal and beauty cabinet of plants gathered from our yard and surrounding community (less than kilometer away).  In the infusions of vinegar, oils and honey,  organic and local products are sourced if available.  Links to plant properties are included on some of them.  These are for my daughter to investigate the properties of these gifts from nature!

Dried Seeds

Seeds are the fruit of the the plant and can be saved for future planting or used in cooking & baking or for sprouting.  Some seeds can be ground into flour, prepared as a coffee replacement or to make for tea.


Dried Flowers

Dried flowers can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for future medicinal’s, to add scent & colour to recipes & space and to make natural dyes.


Dried Leaves

Dried leaves can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for future medicinal’s, and to make natural dyes.


Dried Root

Dried roots can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for future medicinal’s,

  • Comphrey
  • Dandelion
  • Mullein
  • Yellow Dock

by Renee Lindstrom

Infused Honey, Vinegar’s & Combining Oils into Creams

Infused Honey

Honey is nature’s anti-bacterial and can be enjoyed with meals or as a medicinal. Imagine enjoying infused honey with your favorite flowers and getting the added benefit of nature’s nutrition.

  • Bay Flower
  • Dandelion
  • Lilac
  • Gumweed

Recipes


by Renee Lindstrom

Infused Oils, Tinctures & Vinegar’s


Infused Oils

Infused oils can be used in recipes and in skin & hair products.

  • Bamboo
  • Basil
  • Bay Flower
  • Calendula
  • Cedar
  • Comphrey
  • Dandelion
  • English Daisey
  • Feverfew
  • Forsythia
  • Gingko
  • Gumweed
  • Hollyhock
  • Lavendar
  • Lilac
  • Mullein Flower
  • Mullein Leaf
  • Mullein Root
  • Oregon Grape
  • Parsley
  • Rose
  • Rosemary Flower
  • Rue
  • Self Heal
  • Shasta Daisy
  • Tea Tree
  • White Birch
  • Yellow Dock

Recipes


Infused Tinctures

Tinctures are herbal extracts made with alcohol and extracts are those mixed with water, vinegar and glycerin.  Tinctures can be taken as herbal medicinal’s and for soothing skin ailments.

An adult would generally take 6 to 10 drops, 3 to 4 times a day.  For children cut that amount by one half (1/2).  For best results take for a period of 30 days.  

  • Bamboo – longevity, rejuvenation, anti – aging, anti-inflammatory,   antioxidant, immune booster,  thyroid health, hair, nails, skin, gums & teeth
  • Basil –  stress, energy, arthritis, heart tonic, cough & colds
  • Bay Flower – aches & pain, headaches & migraines, stress, sleep aid, colic, flatulence, eyes,  antiseptic, diuretic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory
  • Calendula – antibacterial & anti-inflammatory properties, as well as being a strong antiseptic, astringent,  rashes, diaper rash, minor burns, acne, and eczema
  • Comfrey –  colitis, diarrhea, laxative, sedative, bleeding gums, hoarseness & throat infection, fatigue, cramps in the legs, anemia, pain & arthritis
  • Dandelion –  PMS,  depression, fatigue, digestive aid, natural diuretic, blood cleanser, detoxifer, tinnitus, tonsillitis, pneumonia, bronchitis, osteoporosis, abscesses, heart health, mammary tumors, warts
  • Feverfew – migraines, toothaches, nausea, vomiting, sleep, digestion, asthma attacks, dizziness, tinnitus, arthritis, psoriasis, eczema, menstrual cramps & prostate problems, indigestion, colds, fevers
  • Gumweed – sedative, antispasmodic, and expectorant, ear & throat infections, muscle relaxer
  • Ginkgo – headaches, sinusitis, vertigo, circulation, Reynaud’s disease, Parkinson’s, dementia, depression, fatigue, attention span, memory,  astringent, anti-fungal and antibacterial
  • Hollyhock – soar throat, ulcers,  IBS, vomiting, diarrhea, kidney infections,
  • Lavender –  sleep aid, stress release, migraine, energizer
  • Lilac – worms, malaria, fever
  • Mullein – sore throat, pain, cold, flu, sleep aid, sedative, cramps, astringent, antibacterial & antiseptic, joints, arthritis & muscle pain, earache, immune system booster & swollen joints
  • Oregon Grape – colds, flu, blood purifier,  jaundice, hepatitis, eczema, acne, herpes, & psoriasis, natural anti-biotic qualities, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal & antibacterial
  • Rosemary Flower – antioxidant & anti-inflammatory
  • Rue – indigestion, colic, flatulence, cramps, menstrual pain, headaches, circulation, coughs, stress, anxiety, nerve & muscle pain
  • Self Heal Herb – ulcers, anti-viral, anti-bacterial, mouth ulcers, sore throats, swollen glands, liver gallbladder stimulant, conjunctivitis, hypertension, headaches & fevers

Recipes


Infused Vinegar’s

Infused Vinegar’s can be used in recipes or used as tinctures.

  • Bamboo
  • Basil
  • Dandelion
  • English Daisy
  • Lavender
  • Lilac
  • Oregon Grape
  • Rosemary

Recipes


Recommended Reading:

  • Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992

Book Review:  Wonderful Book, everyone should have a copy – on June 24, 1997 – I have every single one of this authors books. The information in them is terrific, including this one. It covers the different types of herbal philosophies. Mainly the Chinese and Ayurvedic systems. He integrates them both with western herbs, and makes it work. I won’t say his book has everything and every herb but it has a lot, and some of the more unusual herbs you usually can’t find in the regular every day herb books. It’s wonderful, and worth every penny you pay for it

  • The Modern Herbal Dispensatory: A Medicine-Making Guide by North Atlantic Books, 2016, by Thomas Easley (Author), Steven Horne (Author)

    Book Comment:  5.0 out of 5 stars – This is a great book about making herbal medicine – By L. Meissneron on June 23, 2017
    Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase:  This is a great book about making herbal medicine. It goes into great detail with the different ways to make herbal medicine and specific ways to prepare certain plants. There are also tons of great herbal recipes to follow. Not just for beginners, but those who what to expand their knowledge of herbal preparations.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

 

Privet

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

tea kettleDyeMortar

Privet ( ligustrum lucidum)

  • Part of the olive family (Oleaceae)

I planted what I thought was a small shrub five years ago that was gifted to us. With no identifying information to go along with I was surprised after two years when it began stretching, spreading and growing taller.  It is now 10 feet high and getting wider.  According to different sources of information could grow from 15 to 30 feet high.  The is the evergreen that many topiary cuttings are created with and it is popular for use in Bonsai.  It flowered for the first time two years ago and this year there are many fruits developing as we enter into fall.  The flowers are a nice fragrance to begin with but slowly they become less attractive over the days as the blooms diminish.  This year this Privet is gifting us with an abundance of fruit that are forming from the spent flowers.  When the fruits are ripe in the fall, these are the main part of this plant used in Traditional Chinese and Herbal Remedies.  The leaves, flowers and bark can also used.  You will find the dried berries ground up in many medicinal and beauty products!

Nutrients & Qualities: 

Privet has applications as a  diuretic, astringent, antiseptic, immuno-stimulant, anti-cholestrolemic and it has anti-cancer properties.  It is known to invigorate the immune system.

  • Constituents:
    • quercetin glycosides;  flavonol glycosides, secoiridoids (oleuropein, ligustaloside A, ligustaloside B, and ligstroside)
    • kaempferol glycosides
    • polyphenols
    • oleanolic
    • palmitic
    • linoleic
    • ursolic acids
    • mannitol
    • glucose
    • starch
    • bitter resin
    • bitter extractive
    • albumen
    • salts
    • ligustrin

Therapeutic Uses:

  • Flowers:
    • Headaches
    • Vaginal Irritations
    • Menstrual Problems
  • Leaves:
    • Diarrhea
    • Bladder disorders
      Stomach ulcers
      Indigestion
      Increase appetite.
      Sore throat & eyes
      Ulcers
      Swellings
      Mumps
      Chapped lips
      Throat cancer
  • Leaves & bark: 
    • Headaches
    • Tumours
      Bronchitis
      Coughs
      Light-headedness
    • Chronic bowel problems
    • Vaginal douche
    • Mouthwash or gargle
    • Wash for skin problems
  • Seeds:
    • Liver & Kidney ailments
      Increase energy
      Menopause
      Insomnia
      Premature aging
      Grey hair
      Heart palpitations
      Rheumatoid arthritis
      Tinnitus (a ringing in the ear)
      Backache
      Eye issues inclduing
      cataracts, glaucoma & cataract
      Contagious ailments: hepatitis B & sexually transmitted diseases (STD)
      High blood pressure (hypertension) Pneumocystis Carinii pneumonia (a fungal infection of the lungs)
      Respiratory problems

How to use Leaves & Bark:

Boil 1 tsp. leaves or bark in 1 cup water. Take 1 to 2 cups a day.


Recommended Reading:

  • Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992
  • Book Review:  Wonderful Book, everyone should have a copy
    • on June 24, 1997 – I have every single one of this authors books. The information in them is terrific, including this one. It covers the different types of herbal philosophies. Mainly the Chinese and Ayurvedic systems. He integrates them both with western herbs, and makes it work. I won’t say his book has everything and every herb but it has a lot, and some of the more unusual herbs you usually can’t find in the regular every day herb books. It’s wonderful, and worth every penny you pay for it

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

Eating Dandelion Flower’s & Infusing in Oils

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

 

A focus this spring has been on Dandelion Flowers.  As they emerge with their bright colours you can’t help but notice them!  Did you know they were edible and nutritious.  Each flower you get a hit of it’s goodness.  Some ways to enjoy them are by making:

  • jelly – infuse and follow your jelly recipe (I used honey instead of sugar)
  • pancakes – just add to you cake in the pan when cooking
  • tempura – my favorite, coat flower and cook in oil
  • infusing in oil – used olive oil in mason jar
  • infusing in vinegar – used wine vinegar in mason jar
  • infusing in alcohol – used 100% vodka

For Recipes – read more

Read more on The Amazing Dandelion

How to Infuse Wildflower Oils


Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


 

 

 

Neem for bug & slug control! Slugs jumped from lettuce!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience.  Thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Neem Bug & Slug Spray

Neem Tree – (Azadirachta indica)

This week the slugs moved into the lettuce patch and the cabbage moths began nibbling all the tender leaves of new shoots!  I remembered reading  neem powder (the ground up leaves of a Neem tree) can be used as a natural pesticide.  I decided to give it a try.

I took a small pot filled with water and added a tablespoon of neem powder.  I brought it to a boil and then let it sit over-night to cool and infuse.

The next morning I put it into a spray bottle and added a small shot of dish soap and salad oil and then gave it a shake to mix it all together.  The oil and dish soap help the solution stick to the leaves.

Early enough to catch the slugs on the leaves I began spraying not knowing what to expect. I must have blinked as the slug disappeared from the leaf I was spraying.  I couldn’t believe it.  I located it on the ground and sprayed around it again.  When I looked a second later it was gone.  For me, this is the first solution that has been visibly effective for slugs!

My hope is that it is as effective for the cabbage flies! I remember reading that they don’t like the smell of neem therefore won’t be attracted to the plants.  This is also true for fly’s, mosquitoes and fleas!  I wonder it would work for deer?  They hate strong scents as well!

Recipe

  • Neem Powder – 1 tablespoon
  • Water – 4 cups
  • Dish-soap – teaspoon
  • Oil – teaspoon to tablespoon

Bring water and neem to a boil and let sit to infuse overnight.  Pour into a spray bottle and add dish-soap and oil.  Shake well.  It’s ready to use!

Update

No new bites the following day however on the lettuce in the garden the cheeky slugs did find the leaves that I missed!  Will have to be more careful in the future. Also the yellow dock that I let grow for salad greens are now being eaten.  I have not seen this in previous years!  I am happy they are going for the weeds.

For your convenience order Neem here


 

Do you harvest your Bamboo or complain that it is invasive?

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Arrggg, I am starting to get annoyed at hearing opinions about plants being invasive and the frustration one feels at the natural characteristics of the plants to grow!  Now with an increased focus of  exploring the benefits of the plants growing right in our own gardens, when I hear this type of statement, I change it in my mind to, “I am not harvesting this plant and letting it overgrow.”  Imagine blaming a plant for growing!  

One of the plants that I hear this comment the most about is Bamboo.  Bamboo is one of the most versatile plants on the planet and it cleans our atmosphere at an alarming high rate.  It is time to love your bamboo! 

My love affair with bamboo began when I recognized that it was a calming influence for me.  Whether it was the appearance of the stalks and leaves, or its rustling sound in the wind, a peaceful settling was immediate.  After growing this plant for sometime now even a picture of it has the same calming experience.

It took five years for it to fill in along a fence line where I had planted it.  It adds privacy between the sidewalk and our backyard.  It keeps the dust blown up by the cars that travel behind the fence  down and it muffles the sound of cars.  It is our white noise!

I began harvesting the leaves to explore infusions and teas. It is wonderful to use in one’s hair, bath and to soak finger and toe nails.  I learned how to process the leaves to create a tea.  By the photos below you can view how a yin backyard became a yang experience!

 

 

This year the stalks have exploded!  I have increased the harvesting of the leaves and begun harvesting the stalks.

Enjoying the learning experience of how to use bamboo, I’ve dyed material, made paper and recently used it to soak the metal dishes that sit under the electric stove elements. Silica is used to clean metal and bamboo has a high content of silica!

 

 

I have begun cutting the long stalks to learn how to dry bamboo to create a privacy screen in my office and stalks for the garden.  I have been given some fat bamboo stalks that I will cut up into a short Zen type fence!  Pictures to follow!


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